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Summary of Effects of massage therapy and occlusal splint therapy



On electromyographic activity and the intensity of signs and symptoms in individuals with temporomandibular disorder and sleep bruxism: a randomized clinical trial


Cid André Fidelis de Paula Gomes, Yasmin El Hage, [...], and Daniela Aparecida Biasotto-Gonzalez



Reference




(Ref ID): PMC4266206


Chosen Image filename: PMC4266206_Figure_01.jpg




Document structure and format:


I. Introduction


A. This research paper aims to investigate the effects of massage therapy and occlusal splint therapy on electromyographic activity and the intensity of signs and symptoms in individuals with severe temporomandibular disorder (TMD) and sleep bruxism, which is characterized by clenching and/or grinding of teeth during sleep and may be involved in perpetuating TMD.


B. The main research question of the study is whether the combination of massage therapy and a muscle-relaxing oral appliance would lead to a decrease in electromyographic activity in the masseter and anterior temporal muscles, as well as a reduction in the intensity of signs and symptoms of TMD.


II. Methodology


A. A blinded, randomized, clinical trial was conducted, with 60 participants with severe TMD and sleep bruxism randomly distributed into four treatment groups: massage group, conventional occlusal splint group, massage + conventional occlusal splint group, and silicone occlusal splint group. The treatments were applied for four weeks, and all groups were evaluated before and after treatment through electromyographic analysis of the masseter and anterior temporal muscles and the Fonseca Patient History Index.


B. Data was collected using electromyographic analysis and the Fonseca Patient History Index to measure the intensity of signs and symptoms. Data analysis was conducted using the Wilcoxon test and repeated-measures ANOVA.


C. The study may be limited by the use of a small sample size and the inclusion of individuals from only one university community in Brazil.


III. Results


A. Results showed that massage therapy and the use of an occlusal splint had no significant influence on electromyographic activity of the masseter or anterior temporal muscles. However, the combination of therapies led to a reduction in the intensity of signs and symptoms among individuals with severe TMD and sleep bruxism.


B. The study also demonstrated that Group 3 (massage + conventional occlusal splint group) had a greater improvement in the intensity of TMD compared to the other groups.


C. Statistical analyses revealed no statistically significant differences in median frequency between pre-treatment and post-treatment evaluation in any of the groups.


IV. Discussion


A. The findings of the study suggest that while massage therapy and the use of an occlusal splint may not significantly impact electromyographic activity of the masseter or anterior temporal muscles, the combination of both may reduce the intensity of signs and symptoms of TMD and sleep bruxism.


B. The implications of these findings suggest that a multidisciplinary approach to treating TMD and sleep bruxism combining physical therapy modalities such as massage therapy with oral appliances like occlusal splints may be beneficial in reducing the intensity of signs and symptoms.


C. Further research may be needed to explore the long-term effects of such treatments and their effectiveness in individuals with a wider range of severity levels.


V. Conclusion


A. In summary, the study aimed to investigate the effects of massage therapy and occlusal splint therapy on electromyographic activity and the intensity of signs and symptoms in individuals with severe TMD and sleep bruxism.


B. The study concluded that while massage therapy and occlusal splint therapy may not significantly affect electromyographic activity of the masseter or anterior temporal muscles, the combination of therapies may reduce the intensity of signs and symptoms in individuals with severe TMD and sleep bruxism.


C. The findings suggest that a multidisciplinary approach may be beneficial in treating TMD and sleep bruxism, but further research is needed to explore its effectiveness in a wider range of individuals.




Figure 1: Median (25% and 75% quartile) of median frequency (Hz) in right and left anterior temporal and masseter muscles during maximum voluntary clenching in each group (non-significant differences, p > 0.05; Kruskal-Wallis test).
Courtesy of PMC4266206



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