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Summary of Effect of manual physical therapy on sleep quality and jaw mobility in patients with bruxism



A biopsychosocial randomized controlled trial


Mohamed H. El-Gendy, Mostafa M. Ibrahim, [...], and Hamada A. Hamada




Reference

 

 

 

(Ref ID): PMC9774945


Chosen Image filename:  PMC9774945_Figure_01.jpg

 



Document structure and format:

 

I. Introduction

 

This research paper titled "Effect of manual physical therapy on sleep quality and jaw mobility in patients with bruxism: A biopsychosocial randomized controlled trial" explores the impact of deep-stripping and trigger-point pressure release massage on sleep quality, jaw mobility, and pressure pain threshold in patients with sleep bruxism. Bruxism is the habitual grinding or clenching of teeth, which can lead to various symptoms and conditions. The significance of this study lies in understanding the potential benefits of manual physical therapy in managing bruxism and improving sleep quality and jaw mobility.

 

The main research question of this study is: Does manual physical therapy, specifically deep-stripping and trigger-point pressure release massage, have a positive effect on sleep quality and jaw mobility in patients with bruxism?

 

II. Methodology

 

The study utilized a randomized controlled trial design. The participants consisted of 45 patients diagnosed with sleep bruxism who were randomly assigned to three groups. Group I served as the control group and received transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and passive stretching. Group II received deep-stripping massage, and Group III received trigger-point pressure release massage. Data collection occurred before and after a 6-week period.

 

Data analysis involved comparing the outcomes between the three groups using statistical tests. The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) was used to measure sleep quality, and jaw mobility was assessed through various movements. Pressure pain threshold (PPT) of masticatory muscles was also measured. Statistical analyses were conducted to determine the effectiveness of the interventions on these variables.

 

The limitations of this study may include a relatively small sample size and potential biases related to the subjective nature of some measurements, such as sleep quality assessment and self-reported symptoms.

 

III. Results

 

The study found significant improvements in sleep quality (PSQI), jaw mobility, and pressure pain threshold in the group that received deep-stripping massage compared to the control group and the group that received trigger-point pressure release massage. The improvements were observed in various measures, including jaw opening, jaw protrusion, jaw lateral movement, jaw retraction, and pressure pain threshold of different masticatory muscles.

 

IV. Discussion

 

In relation to the research question and objectives, the results suggest that deep-stripping massage as a form of manual physical therapy can effectively improve sleep quality and jaw mobility in patients with bruxism. The findings highlight the potential benefits of this intervention in managing bruxism-related symptoms. The study's results have implications for the use of manual physical therapy techniques in the treatment of bruxism and may contribute to the development of more effective interventions.

 

However, it is important to note that this study has certain limitations. The sample size was relatively small, and the subjective nature of some measurements may introduce biases. Further research with larger sample sizes and diverse populations is needed to validate the findings and explore other potential factors influencing bruxism.

 

V. Conclusion

 

In summary, the study demonstrates that deep-stripping massage, as a form of manual physical therapy, can lead to improvements in sleep quality and jaw mobility in patients with bruxism. These findings have implications for the management of bruxism-related symptoms and suggest the potential benefits of incorporating manual physical therapy techniques into treatment approaches. Further research is warranted to validate these findings and explore additional factors that may influence bruxism.

 



Figure 1: Flow of patients through the trial.
Courtesy of PMC9774945


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